KMSP

Minneapolis St Paul Intl/Wold Chamberlain Airport

Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

Noise Abatement Information - Last update 04/09/2015

HIGH

  Overview

Through coordinated efforts with communities and airport users, the MAC Noise Program Office strives to develop effective noise reduction solutions and to provide pertinent, understandable information. Our mission is facilitating the noise sensitive operation of the MAC’s system of airports through collaborative efforts employing available resources and technologies in a fiscally responsible manner optimizing the benefits of noise reduction for the airport’s surrounding communities and users of the MAC airport system.

For decades, the MAC has been engaging communities, airport operators and the Federal Aviation Administration – and using state-of-the-art technology – in an effort to reduce aircraft noise impacts at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP) and at the MAC’s six reliever airports.

In MSP’s earliest days, nearby neighborhoods were not greatly effected by occasional aircraft noise. By the mid-1960s, as communities expanded and air travel increased, aircraft noise surfaced as a significant community concern. Realizing the importance of addressing aircraft noise issues in the communities, the MAC engaged in a cooperative approach to addressing them and the Metropolitan Aircraft Sound Abatement Council (MASAC) was created in 1969. Some of MASAC’s efforts resulted in the elimination of training flights at MSP, the addition of a noise abatement specialist to the MAC staff and the establishment of a noise complaint hotline to handle noise complaint calls and to provide information to residents around MSP.

MASAC disbanded in 2000 and the MAC established a Blue Ribbon Panel to develop a new framework for an aircraft noise advisory committee. The MSP Noise Oversight Committee (NOC) was established in 2002. The MAC Noise Program Office works closely with the NOC and is dedicated to collecting, analyzing and reporting aircraft operations data for the purpose of working with the communities surrounding the MAC’s system of airports on aircraft noise issues.

  Mandatory Restrictions

All Aircraft Categories

Engine Run-ups Prohibited 2230-0600 local time (MSP Field Rule)

All run-ups must be scheduled and approved in advance with MAC Airside Operations by calling (612)726-5111.

Approved run-up hours will be from 0600 – 2230L daily. Any engine run-up for any purpose other than aircraft movement during quiet hours will be restricted to idle power only.

Airlines operating at MSP are required to conduct maintenance run-ups at a designated run-up pad and to comply with the MSP Run-up Field Rule.

. The following information is required at the time of the request:
• Type of aircraft and aircraft tail number
• Proposed start time
• Proposed end time




All Aircraft Categories

West Cargo Ramp Hushkitted Aircraft Engine Start Procedure

This program was implemented in July 2007 on the cargo ramp located west of Runway 17/35. The procedure outlines specific aircraft tugging operations and aircraft positioning on the ramp area prior to aircraft engine starts, which significantly reduces aircraft noise impacts for hundreds of residents in the City of Richfield adjacent to Runway 17/35.




Aircraft Categories: B, C, D & E

Nighttime Power-backs

All airlines at MSP have agreed to eliminate power-back from the gates during the nighttime hours. All nighttime flights will be pushed back from the gates with aircraft tugs.




All Runways  |  All Aircraft Categories  |  Arrival & Departure

Training Restriction

The major air carriers operating at MSP have agreed not to conduct training operations (e.g., touch-and-go operations) at MSP.

  Curfews

Aircraft Categories: A, B, C, D & E

Voluntary Nighttime Agreement

The air carriers operating at MSP have agreed to limit the use of modified Stage 3 aircraft for scheduled operations during the nighttime hours of 10:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. when possible.

  Images / Diagrams

Runways: 12L & 12R  |  All Aircraft Categories  |  Departure Only

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Runway 17  |  Aircraft Categories: B, C, D & E  |  Departure Only

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  Arrivals

All Runways  |  Aircraft Categories: A, B, C, D & E  |  Arrival Only

Noise Sensitive Arrivals

Several residential neighborhoods around MSP are impacted by aircraft noise as aircraft arrive to the airport and establish themselves on the final approach path (especially Runways 35, 12L and 12R). Additional noise is created by the increased drag and disruption of airflow along an aircraft’s surface when a pilot extends the aircraft landing gear. The frequency and concentration of arriving aircraft and the additional noise created by early aircraft gear extensions have caused concern for impacted neighborhoods and have been the source of several aircraft noise-related complaints.

HOW PILOTS CAN HELP WITH ARRIVAL OPERATIONS AT MSP:

When possible, and in compliance with ATC clearances/aircraft standard operating procedures, delay extending your landing gear until it is necessary for a safe landing. Doing so will minimize the additional noise exposure over residential areas created by the extended landing gear.




Runway 17  |  All Aircraft Categories  |  Arrival Only

Limited Use of Runway 17 for Arrivals

Arrivals on Runway 17 are limited. Use of Runway 17 for arrivals may only occur for safety reasons, weather conditions, or temporary runway closures due to snow removal, runway construction or other special circumstances at MSP.




Runways: 30L & 30R  |  All Aircraft Categories  |  Departure Only

Minneapolis Straight-out Departure Procedure

Residents living straight out from Runways 30L and 30R experience all of the overflights from arrival operations on Runways 12L and 12R. The Minneapolis Straight-out Departure Procedure was implemented to try to avoid sending aircraft departing from Runways 30L and 30R straight out over areas northwest of MSP. The procedure, when feasible for the FAA, requires that all departures from Runways 30L and 30R be given a heading other than runway heading.

  Departures

All Runways  |  Aircraft Categories: A, B, C, D & E  |  Departure Only

Noise Abatement Departure Profiles

Noise Abatement Departure Profiles (NADP) were designed to reduce noise exposure for residents living close into an airport (within 3.5 miles/close-in procedure) or further out (beyond 3.5 miles/distant procedure) from an airport. The MAC has designated the distant procedure for runways at MSP: 4/22, 12L/30R, 12R/30L and 17. The Distant NADP, sometimes referred to as the “Standard” procedure, is designed to benefit residents further from the airport (beyond 3.5 miles). Pilots should consult their aircraft’s operating handbook/flight manual to fly the company-specified distant NADP.

HOW PILOTS CAN HELP WITH NADPs:

Follow the procedures outlined in your aircraft operating handbook or flight manual to ensure proper implementation of the Distant NADP. Fly the procedure each and every time you depart MSP.




Runways: 12L & 12R  |  Aircraft Categories: B, C, D & E  |  Departure Only

Eagan-Mendota Heights Corridor Departure Procedure

The area immediately southeast of MSP, beyond the Minnesota River, is purposely developed as commercial/industrial, which is an ideal area for aircraft to overfly when they depart Runways 12L and 12R.

Whenever possible, Air Traffic Control (ATC) will direct departing jet aircraft to Runways 12L and 12R so that they will over-fly the corridor and stay within the corridor boundaries. ATC will assign specific headings depending on which runway the aircraft is departing from: headings for jet aircraft are inclusive of 090 degrees, 105 degrees and 120 degrees. A wind-corrected heading may also be assigned.

Turboprop aircraft will be assigned a non-corridor heading so that the corridor does not become congested and can be used for jet aircraft departures.

HOW PILOTS CAN HELP WITH THE CORRIDOR:

Compliance with the corridor procedure is largely dependent on ATC and its ability to assign a corridor heading and/or a wind-corrected heading. Pilots should anticipate a corridor heading (or wind-corrected heading) and should precisely follow the assigned headings. By precisely following assigned headings, a greater percentage of jet operations will remain within the corridor boundaries and reduce noise impact on nearby communities.




Runway 17  |  Aircraft Categories: A, B, C, D & E  |  Departure Only

Runway 17 Turbojet Departure Procedure

Runway 17/35 is 8,000 feet in length and opened October 27, 2005. To help make the runway a success, the MAC gained approval for an innovative procedure off Runway 17 that reduces noise impacts for residents in close proximity to the departure end. The success of this runway procedure is largely dependent on minimizing noise impacts from operations on this runway to the greatest extent possible.

The procedure is identified as the “Runway 17 Turbojet Departure Procedure”. The Runway 17 Departure Procedure is implemented via ATC instructions to the pilots. The FAA issued a notice (MSP AT N7110.208) stating “All aircraft departing Runway 17 that will be assigned a heading west of runway heading by the Tower shall initially be instructed to fly runway heading. The controller shall issue the appropriate westbound heading after the aircraft is observed reaching the 3.03 DME DBRITE marking.”

HOW PILOTS CAN HELP WITH THE RUNWAY 17 TURBOJET DEPARTURE PROCEDURES:

Familiarize yourself with the Runway 17 Turbojet Departure Procedure as the primary procedure for Runway 17 departures and precisely follow ATC instructions. During low-demand time periods pilots may receive instructions to perform slightly modified procedures such as the Runway 17 River Published Departure Procedure or the Runway 17 River Departure Heading Procedure. Successful implementation of these procedures will help to reduce residential noise impacts from Runway 17 departures.




Runway 35  |  All Aircraft Categories  |  Departure Only

Limited Use of Runway 35 for Departures

Departures on Runway 35 are limited. Use of Runway 35 for departures may only occur for safety reasons, weather conditions, or temporary runway closures due to snow removal, runway construction or other special circumstances at MSP.

  Preferential Runways

Aircraft Categories: A, B, C, D & E  |  Arrival & Departure

Runway Use System

The Runway Use System at MSP prioritizes noise-sensitive runway selection as follows:

Departures

1. Runways 12L and 12R

2. Runway 17

3. Balanced use of Runway 4/22

4. Runways 30L and 30R

Arrivals

1. Runways 30L and 30R

2. Runway 35

3. Balanced use of Runway 4/22

4. Runways 12L and 12R

  Engine Runup

Engine Run-ups Prohibited 2230-0600 local time (MSP Field Rule)

All run-ups must be scheduled and approved in advance with MAC Airside Operations by calling (612)726-5111.

Approved run-up hours will be from 0600 – 2230L daily. Any engine run-up for any purpose other than aircraft movement during quiet hours will be restricted to idle power only.

Airlines operating at MSP are required to conduct maintenance run-ups at a designated run-up pad and to comply with the MSP Run-up Field Rule.

. The following information is required at the time of the request:
• Type of aircraft and aircraft tail number
• Proposed start time
• Proposed end time

  Flight Training

Training Restriction

The major air carriers operating at MSP have agreed not to conduct training operations (e.g., touch-and-go operations) at MSP.

  Community Groups/Info

MSP Noise Oversight Committee (NOC)

The MAC established the MSP Noise Oversight Committee (NOC) to provide a balanced forum for interested parties to consider noise mitigation initiatives in the context of beneft, feasibility and fiscal considerations. The NOC held its first meeting in June 2003.




Metropolitan Airports Commission Noise Program office Website — www.macnoise.com

This website facilitates dissemination of information pertaining to aircraft noise and operations, and includes:

•Query options for aircraft operations data and aircraft noise levels
•Mapping tools to help determine eligibility for the Residential Noise Mitigation Program
•Access to monthly operations and noise reports
•Display of arrival or departure flight tracks
•Meeting dates for the MSP Noise Oversight Committee and other MAC scheduled meetings
•Option for registering a noise complaint on-line




Pilot Education Program and Noise Abatement Sensitivity Training

The MAC works with the aircraft operators that utilize MSP and with the Air Traffic Controllers to encourage awareness of noise issues and to help increase compliance with current noise abatement procedures. In 2010, an MSP Pilot Guide was published on the Noise Program Office website and distributed to airlines operating at MSP.

  Flight Track Monitoring

The MAC Noise Program Office collects flight track data by using a system of eight multilateration (MLAT) sensors. All aircraft are required to be equipped with a transponder when operating within Class B airspace surrounding MSP. The communication stream between the transponder and the radar is interpreted by the MLAT sensors that continuously monitor aircraft transponder transmissions in the airspace extending 40 miles outward from MSP in all directions.

MLAT sensors work in conjunction with one another to determine an aircraft’s location by comparing the difference in time (this is known as Time Difference of Arrival) between the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) radar and aircraft transponders. Additionally, transponder interrogation returns from anti-collision systems are used by the system to determine aircraft position. A minimum of four MLAT sensors is required to determine an aircraft’s position.

Each MLAT site consists of an antenna, a global positioning system (GPS) receiver, a transponder receiver and a computer. The GPS receiver provides accurate time identification of each transponder signal.

The technology being used to collect and process flight data provides a high level of accuracy, quick data update rates, expansive coverage and superb reliability when compared to traditional flight tracking systems.

The aircraft positional data are captured and transmitted in real time continuously to a central processor maintained by an external secure data-handler. This data-handler is authorized by the FAA to decode the data through a sequence of mathematical calculations. The raw flight track data are then provided to the MAC for processing and publishing.

Before being published, the aircraft position data are correlated with Aircraft Situation Display to Industry (ASDI) data provided by the FAA, detailing available information about an aircraft’s flight plan (e.g., aircraft type, flight identification, arrival and departure airport, etc.). The published data are made available to the public on the MAC Noise Program Office website and include “near real-time” flight activity displayed with a 20-minute delay.

  Noise Monitoring

The MAC owns and operates a system of 39 Remote Monitoring Towers (RMT), which is one of the most extensive permanent aircraft noise monitoring systems in the world. This system monitors noise events continuously in communities surrounding MSP.

Each RMT site consists of laboratory-quality noise monitoring equipment that includes a noise analyzer, a preamplifier and a measurement microphone. This equipment undergoes annual calibration and certification by an independent accredited laboratory.

The analyzer in each RMT monitors noise levels continuously utilizing slow response with A-weighting as directed by the Federal Aviation Regulations (14 CFR Part 150). The analyzer is set to detect an event when the sound pressure level (SPL) reaches 65 dBA and records an event when the SPL remains at or above 63 dBA for at least eight seconds. These recorded noise events are then downloaded daily and correlated with the MLAT flight tracks to determine whether the noise source was an aircraft event or a community event.

Each RMT has an “area of influence”, which can be thought of as a cylinder surrounding it. The size of the area of influence varies based on the location of the RMT. If an aircraft flies through the area of influence and correlates with the time of a noise event then the event is determined to be caused by the aircraft. When multiple aircraft correlate to the same noise event, the aircraft that is known to produce louder events is correlated with the event. If there is no aircraft in the area of influence during the noise event window of time, the event is determined to be caused by a source within the community.

  Pilot Guide

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  Airport Contact Info

Name: Jennifer Lewis, Noise Program Office Specialist
Phone: 612-725-6327
Noise Hotline: 612-726-9411
Fax: 612-725-6310
Email: jennifer.lewis@mspmac.org
Web Address: http://www.macnoise.com
Noise Complaint Address: http://www.macnoise.com/our-neighbors/file-noise-complaint
Address:
6040 28th Avenue South
Minneapolis MN 55450

  AOPA Noise Awareness Steps (Not Applicable)

Not applicable.

  NBAA Procedures (Not Applicable)

Not applicable.

Temporary Information (None)

None

Preferential Instrument Procedures (None)

None

Reverse Thrust (No Restrictions)

No restrictions

Pattern Altitudes (None Specified. Refer to FAA A/FD.)

None specified. refer to faa a/fd.

Intersection Takeoffs (No Restrictions)

No restrictions

APU Use (No Restrictions)

No restrictions

Stage II (No Restrictions)

No restrictions

Stage III (No Restrictions)

No restrictions

Noise Ordinance (None)

None

Prior Permission (PPR) Operations (None)

None

Airport Maps

Airport Contact

Name: Jennifer Lewis, Noise Program Office Specialist
Phone: 612-725-6327
Noise: 612-726-9411
Fax: 612-725-6310
Address:
6040 28th Avenue South
Minneapolis MN 55450

Send Email

Go to Web Site

Go to Noise Complaint Site

Weather Data

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Airport Data

Elevation: 841 ft
City: Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Sectional Chart: Twin Cities
Flight Service: Princeton FSS
Control Tower: Yes
Wind Indicator: Yes
Fuel: 100LLA
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